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sanctions, more sanctions. we will get congress to pass a law that will make it illegal for us to have any carrots. that means that diplomacy will not work. it is dangerous across the board. the reason why it is more dangerous to say a red line will be crossed so early is, number one, it brings it much closer, ratcheting up the political pressure. it does not change anything on the ground. but once a candidate boxes himself in, and we're talking man here, so i will not say himself/herself, one candid it boxes himself in and say i will set as a red line iran obtain nuclear capability. if gov. ronnie's good friend, benjamin netanyahu, says that he believes that iran has obtained nuclear capability, candidate romney would say one thing and president romney would feel differently on making good on that. >> you mentioned the state of israel, the nation of israel. let's talk about that for just a second. mr. netanyahu has been unsuccessful over the past few weeks, no matter how much he has tried, even inside of israel, making the case that he has tried to make about the red line and backing the
women will be delighted about across botswana. according to the law, women and girls are not allowed to inherit property. this left them at the mercy of male relatives. many lost the rights to any prop.. did judge of the high court hearing says law had no place in modern society. >> we very much welcomed the ruling. i think it is a huge step forward, not only in botswana, but throughout the southern half of the region. it is not just botswana that has these discriminatory laws. it is other countries like malawi. this sends a signal hopefully to the region that these kinds of discriminatory laws should no understand. >> discrimination against women exists in many african societies. in uganda, legally married wives are entitled to 15% of the state, with only 1% going to the customary air. the rest goes to the children. in nigeria, the constitution guarantees equality for women. however, women tend to lose property inheritance rights. the ruling in today's case highlights the broader issue of women's rights in africa and there will be many across the continent who will be watching with
a child with an african man at a time when nearly two dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't know his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the
't prosper without rule of law. because that is exactly our main focus, in the sense that we are not prosecuting drugs by drugs themselves. we are looking for rule of law in mexico. we want a country in which the law prevails. otherwise it will be impossible to prosper or to have a fair society. >> rose: we continue talking about google ventures with kevin rose and bill maris. >> we're investing in teams and people more than products at the early stages. so you're looking for larry and certificate guy as they were starting out they are what made google different from lycos and the other search engines. >> rose: we con chrood with the photography of brigitte lacombe. >> she asked would we be interested in doing something similar for london olympic on women in sport. and of course, i mean, it was just like a great opportunity because i mean for me and also for my sister to discover the new world, i know nothing about sports. and it was very intriguing. >> rose: yes. >> and so of course we said yes. >> rose: felipe calderon, bill regard maris, kevin rose and brigitte lacombe whe
federal law by endorsing political candidates from the pulpit. those who do so risk losing their churches' tax-exempt status. according to a recent survey by the christian polling organization lifeway, 87% of pastors believe pastors should refrain from making political endorsements. the survey included both evangelical and mainline clergy. >>> the supreme court opened its new term on monday and a majority of the justices -- six of the nine -- attended the annual red mass, held the sunday before at st. matthew's cathedral in washington. at the annual event, catholic leaders encourage the justices to draw wisdom from their faith as they make their decisions. the court is set to tackle controversial issues once again this term, including a case involving affirmative action at the university of texas. many religious groups are anxious to see if the court will also agree to hear arguments on same-sex marriage. >>> a leading opponent of same-sex marriage, catholic bishop salvatore cordileone, has been elevated to archbishop of san francisco. cordileone was formally installed in a ceremony on th
previously that obamacare, the healthcare tax law would be, quote, great for democrats. well, the seniors i've heard from don't think it's at all great. that over $700 million is being taken out of medicare to pay for the programs. i've heard from so many folks who -- cardiologists gotten out of the cardiology business. he will be a researcher rather than providing those services, so seniors are going to be having, and are already seeing, difficulty in getting access to physicians because of obamacare taking so much money out of medicare and my general view is that healthcare decisions ought to be made by doctors and patients, not government panels up in washington. >> mr. kaine? >> social security and medicare, again, george as a saerns voted for -- senator, voted for a very risky privatization scheme for social security and i can tell you if i'm in the u.s. science, i will fight efforts to privatize social security till my last breath. it would have been a disaster. let's talk about medicare. george suggests i want to take money out of the medicare program. the 700 billion he refers to wa
new. >> here's what conservatives tell me. they embrace law and order conceptually and they say we're talking about enforcing the law and if the law isn't enforced a society cannot hold itself cohesively together. the second thing they say is we can't have a cohesive, coherent country without a common language. if you have two peoples living side by side speaking separate languages, you're not going to have a country. >> we heard the arguments. as far as the language is concerned, everyone knows english is the official language in the country. why is it necessary to make it official by law? i think there's more draw backs to that because, for example, in california when they tried to make english the official language it was virtually impossible. it didn't work. it was approved, but it didn't work. why? because you have so many different languages that are spoken there. besides spanish you have several asian languages. what would happen is in the schools, the schools would be forced to send all materials to parents in english when you have elderly who do not speak the language and
protection under the law. >> we've recognized that there are some interests in diversity that are beneficial in the educational sphere. but we have said and we continue to say that is not an overriding consideration that has to be administered very narrowly because it's an odious and dangerous classification. >> ifill: but university president bill powers argued that concern is trumped by the need for a diverse student body. >> we believe the educational benefits of diversity are so important that they're worth fighting for all way to the united states supreme court. our lawyers this morning effectively made the case to the justices that diversity-- ethnic and otherwise-- benefits all of the students on our campus. >> ifill: the high court last visited the issue in 2003, deciding five to four to let the university of michigan law school could use race as one factor in its admissions process. before then, the university of texas guaranteed acceptance for the top 10% of students at every high school in the state. but after the michigan decision, texas and other schools added re as a facaor for
protection so ensure that they wouldn't be subject to iraqi laws, iraqi courts and so forth. that was the recommendation of the chairman of the joint chiefs. it was clearly the right thing to do at that point. but this was a political decision by prime minister maliki, not some technical issue in the negotiations. >> woodruff: let me ask you about another part of the world, peter feaver. that is china. we heard governor romney say... he cited again and again the need for the united states to take the lead around the world. he said the u.s. should use its great influence to shape events. then he talked about china's recent assertiveness in the pacific region. what would he have the united states do right now to shape events with china? >> well, there has been some bipartisanship on east asia. so the obama administration after flirting with a different policy in 2009 returned to an emphasis on asia that had been there in the previous administration. there was an emphasis that involved strengthening our alliances with japan and india and presenting to china a clear choice about
like we changed these laws through democratic processes or something. so meaning that there could be some type of a law. a change coming up here. so in the whole suggestion of the supreme court, which really hasn't been a big topic of discussion. all these conversations are going on in sub groups. so that is what's going on right now. is sort of this microcampaign. they know exactly, specific areas of interest for each voter and that's why they've been microtargeting things and things going on which we can't even see. gwen: and talking a lot about the future of the supreme court. which you don't hear a lot of on the stump. >> the big hit they took in the polls was based largely on a big swing by women voters. and those -- they know that they have to win -- they're going to lose men. so they are going to have to win women by pollsters tell me 53% or higher to win this election. >> and also don't forget that just a week ago, governor romney to the des moines register was trying to obscure his position on abortion a little bit. he said he didn't have a lig bethive -- a big legislativ
of president obama's health care reform law. >> when times are tough, you decide where you've got to cut. but i am telling you, we don't do it on the backs of our seniors. this is not an entitlement program, like a lot of people in washington call it. it's not an entitlement. it's something you have all paid into since your high school job, just like i did. >> reporter: she's in a dead- heat race with republican chris collins, a former erie county executive and businessman. collins says he supports changes to medicare, but stops well short of endorsing the ryan budget. >> i never said i support the ryan plan. the ryan plan is in the past. it's a romney budget. and that's what i'm looking forward to being a part of the debate in. >> reporter: for hochul, the ryan budget is a political opportunity. >> the ryan budget last year, when they were trying to privatize social security and turn it into a voucher program, it allowed me to show the crystal clear differences between myself and my opponent, a year and a half ago. and the person i'm running against this time, has not only said-- his words are
them but within a certain rule of law, that countries that do that -- and countries that keep their international agreements, i.e., the treaty with israel, countries that do that do well in the modern world. and we should basically be saying "you live up to those principles and we will be happy to partner with you on your schools, on programs to promote literacy, on programs to empower women, on programs to build a stronger electoral politics." but i think we need to make very clear that have's there's a really important principle for me, charlie. the middle east only puts a smile on your face when it starts with them. that is, if we're cramming things down their throat that they don't really want it's not going to happen. and one of the things that i really believe is that the initiative's got to come from them. one thing we must not do, though and it's something we've done for, i think, 40 years, is kind of view it like we need them more than they need us. oh, no, if we actually make these demands on them for this kind of politics, this kind of treatment of women, this kind
action, their minority numbers drop off the cliff. george bush signed a state law that gave the top 10% of any class the right to go to ut. and then gave it a bit of diversity because most of the schools in texas are defacto segregated. but the numbers were still dropping or stagnant. so they have a huge minority population and a day added to what is in affect affirmative- action. >> i am not a court counter. but it seems like this might be a split. it is a split, the decision stands. but we are in another area now. when the founders wrote the constitution, i was 3/5 of a person. the issue of getting into a school was not even there. regarding the issue is beyond desegregation. it is diversity. diversity of this they had nothing to do with the fifth panel. >> i think this is one that we are wrestling with and i don't think that there has been a clear resolution in the society at large. and i think it is very open. but i agree with nina this could be the beginning of the and. >> it is a matter principle. do you judge anybody by the color of their skin or the content of their character a
chinese law at this time. our concern really was a national security concern but it's also a concern about competition. you know, we do not want a chinese government to have the ability to spy on americans who might be huway or z.t.e. customers. we do not want them to be able to spy on our businesses. let me just say this. last year the united states, pursuant to cyber command, the united states lost over 300 billion dollars of trade secrets. that's $300 billion of trade secrets as a result of cyber attacks. >> brown: but excuse me, but is there... is it the lack of evidence? i mean the lack of them being clear with you or is there evidence that they might do something? >> we also have evidence. we have evidence that the chinese government have been doing it. as far as huiwei is concerned we have gotten a lot of data and information about huiwei but most of our concern is the relationship between their government. >> brown: you heard that the company pushed back pretty hard after this report came out. they accuse... they said little more than an exercise in china-bashing. >> the first thin
. and online tonight-- some comic book heroes defy the laws of physics; others get the science right. hari sreenivasan explains. >> sreenivasan: so how much silk does spider-man need to swing through new york city? we talked to one physics professor who is trying to bring science fiction a little closer to science fact. plus, will the new health care law cover non-citizens? yes, if they're here legally. find that story from our partners at kaiser health news on the rundown. and on tonight's edition of "need to know," ray moderates a roundtable discussion about the fiscal cliff and congress's deadline to deal with expiring tax cuts and automatic spending cuts. find a link to "need to know" and much more at newshour.pbs.org. judy. >> woodruff: and that's the newshour for tonight. on monday, we'll talk with npr's peter overby about spending by super-pacs on campaign ads. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. >>
to do with the latino community not coming out to vote. some of the voter i.d. suppression laws, barriers to understanding the deadlines and when you need to vote -- register to vote, to go out and vote. there is language barriers autos well. going out to vote most of these women and men that latinos, hard working, working not just 9:00 to 5:00 they're working the dawn, early hours then until very late. that's another barrier that you can do why latino community is not coming out. but i'm optimistic i think the number will be 12 million for this year. >> that would be good. 50% of eligible. >> it's always a challenge with a younger population, younger people are challenged to vote and so i think that the then becomes exacerbated when you look at the latino vote. i'm very optimistic. in my state of maryland we have something as driver, maryland dream act that will be on our ballot that is great in seven i have to vote. also in addition to removing those barriers, expanding opportunities to vote whether it's early voting or late polling hours those are really important to get peop
picked their students for decades. by state law, three quarters of u.t.'s students are accepted automatically, because they are in the top 10% of their high school classes. the rest go through what the university calls a holistic review, considering factors, like grades, essays, personal experiences and race. even fewer students got in that way in 2008, when fisher didn't make the cut. >> there are going to be certain financial consequences to this young lady because she could not attend the school of her preference. as u.t. says, it is critical within texas to be a u.t. graduate. she can't have that back. >> reporter: but the university has the support of some of the biggest companies in the country. they include dow components like dupont, i.b.m., johnson and johnson, and walmart, who say they depend on colleges to train a diverse pool of potential employees. the companies filed a brief together saying, "the only means of obtaining a properly qualified group of employees is through diversity in institutions of higher education." other groups mirrored the concerns that our labo
assistant professor of law at vanderbilt university. more-- morgan w what do you think here, should the government cap the size of big bank, this is turning out to be a very controversial topic, once again. >> yes, it is. and dan tarullo is one of the best thinkers we have on these issues. so when he speaks we should all listen carefully. on this question, though, i would respectfully take a slightly different view. and one way of thinking about this is during the financial crisis in late 2008, when lehman brothers failed we all remember it almost brought down the whole financial system. lehman brothers was a fairly small firm. at least compared to the giant financial firms we have today including jp pore began, bank of america, citigroup and so on. jpmorgan, those three groups vq size of the sizf lehman brothers before it went bankrupt. and this suggests that maybe size isn't the characteristic we ought to be targeting. >> and so what are you saying? >> don't cap the size, what's the alternative if one ask concerned about this too big to fail issue. >> yeah, well, i mean there are
, have you lost medicare advantage. >> because it working right now. >> because you changed the law. >> let me ask you, if it could help solve the problem, why not very slowly raise the medicare eligibility age by two years as congressman ryan suggests. >> look, i was there when we did that with social security. in 1983. i was one of eight people sitting in the room that included tip o'neill negotiating with president reagan. we all got together and everybody said as long as everybody's in the deal, everybody is in the deal, and everybody is making some sacrifice, we can find a way. we made the system solvent to 2033. we will not, though, be part of any voucher plan eliminating-- the voucher says mom, when are you 65, go out there, shop for the best insurance you can get. you're out of medicare, can you can buy back if if you want with this voucher which will not keep pace, will not keep pace with health-care cost. because if it did keep pace with health-care costs there would be no savings. that is why they go the voucher. we will be no part of a voucher program or the privatizatio
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

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